4 Replies Latest reply on Feb 28, 2013 3:08 PM by Cristian Vasile

    Tableau vs Roambi

    Michael Mixon

      Hi,

       

      At our company there's a lot of debate about whether to use Tableau or Roambi (both products we own) for mobile BI.  Some folks (myself included) think that these applications can be complimentary, because of their different strengths, but some would like one tool to be the primary tool for mobile. 

       

      Tableau is clearly the superior analytics tool, but some of its weaknesses (perceived or real) are the reason we're even having the debate about mobile BI tools.

       

      Tableau Strengths

      • It is much faster and more flexible to develop in.  By comparison, Roambi is quite unforgiving and complicated.
      • Tableau provides a much richer visualization interface, with many more ways to derive meaningful insights out of the data.

       

      Tableau Weaknesses (some of which only pertain to our install of it)

      • Unless you use Reader (which doesn't work on Macs, tablets or phones) you don't have any ability to take a dashboard offline.  Roambi lets you have your metrics offline.
      • Because of how Tableau doesn't play nice with our internal LDAP authentication protocol, we can't use the native iPad or Adroid app.  So users are left having to interact with workbooks via the browser, which puts them at the mercy of network performance, resulting in often slower performance than they would see if they used the Reader.  Since Roambi downloads the data to the device, performance is always really good.

       

      I'm curious if anyone else has had, or is having, similar conversations and whether there are learnings I could leverage.

       

      Thanks,

       

      -Mike

        • 1. Re: Tableau vs Roambi
          Joshua Milligan

          Michael,

           

          A couple of caveats to my opinion:

          1. I've not used Roambi and can't speak to strengths / weaknesses.

          2. I don't speak officially for Tableau nor do I have any inside knowledge of their road map.

           

          Having said that, I would be willing to bet that Tableau will move much faster toward addressing the weaknesses you listed than any other tool is likely to move toward being as easy and intuitive to use.  Tableau is very committed to the ubiquity of their product and they've made no secret of the fact that they see mobile as key to that.  And I think Tableau for Mac is included in the "Top Pain Points" list, so I wouldn't be surprised if that is addressed soon too.

           

          Regards,

          Joshua

          • 2. Re: Tableau vs Roambi
            Jonathan Drummey

            Hi Michael,

             

            Tableau did say at the Customer Conference that they will be releasing Mac and Linux versions this year. Other than that I can't add anything to what Joshua said.

             

            Jonathan

            • 3. Re: Tableau vs Roambi
              Michael Mixon

              Thanks for the feedback.  I agree that Tableau is very likely to address these gaps soon, given their track record of rapidly introducing seismic updates.

               

              Regarding the Mac and Linux versions, I assume that pertains to Reader?  Do you know if there are any plans (or that the capability exists) to introduce an offline version for tablets?

               

              -Mike

              • 4. Re: Tableau vs Roambi
                Cristian Vasile

                Michael,

                 

                you could export the dashboards as .png or .pdf if i remember right, so a workaround could be to design  a very simple  web page with just reports name, and getting report's details trough your web server and feeding tabcmd application with necessary command line flags.

                 

                Doing this, users could get very fast the reports by email. It's a poor man option but without huge resources (cash, staff, time) one could address  this business issues.

                 

                Regards,

                Cristian.