5 Replies Latest reply on May 12, 2016 12:45 PM by Shawn Wallwork

    What happens when you save a .twbx file back to .twb?

    Nathan Brown

      I have a packaged workbook that I would like to export back into .twb format-- when I tested this, it appears that the new .twb file remembers the original source file and is able to reconnect with it instead of the .twbx's extract, and therefore recovers the ability to receive refreshed data from the source file. Is that correct? Is there any loss of functionality that occurs when converting back to the .twb format?

        • 1. Re: What happens when you save a .twbx file back to .twb?
          Derrick Austin

          Hey Nathan,

           

          The only downside is it doesn't package everything up - so if you email it to someone, they'd need all the same resources (images, datasources, extracts, etc.)

           

          - Derrick

          • 2. Re: What happens when you save a .twbx file back to .twb?
            Shawn Wallwork

            Nathan Brown wrote:

            I have a packaged workbook that I would like to export back into .twb format-- when I tested this, it appears that the new .twb file remembers the original source file and is able to reconnect with it instead of the .twbx's extract, and therefore recovers the ability to receive refreshed data from the source file. Is that correct?

             

            I don't believe that's what is actually happening here. When you open a packaged workbook (twbx) and then save it as an unpackaged workbook (twb) Tableau creates a subfolder at the workbooks location that contains the file structure and elements of the of the package. It's the same as if you used a zip utility to unzip the workbook here. So the new twb file is still pointing at copies of the data source, not the original data source.

             

             

            And changing the original data source, won't change the copy in the subfolder.

             

            What you may be doing is removing the extract, and depending on where the original data connection lives Tableau then 'remembers' the data connection, and re-establishes it. But this can be done on a packaged or unpackaged workbook. Of course if you do it on a packaged workbook, and then don't re-extract the connection before saving it (as a twbx), then anyone you send it to that doesn't have access to your database is going to get an error when they open it.

             

            Is that what you're doing?

             

            --Shawn

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            • 3. Re: What happens when you save a .twbx file back to .twb?
              Nathan Brown

              That's interesting. My plan was to take a .twbx file (that has some fancy work in it I don't want to lose) and save a copy as a .twb to give a colleague for further development. I can give him the source files as well, so if Tableau "remembers' the data connection, it sounds like that might work (i.e. he gets a file with the fancy new sheets, but also  can receive future refreshes from the source file, etc.). Does that make sense?

              • 4. Re: What happens when you save a .twbx file back to .twb?
                Derrick Austin

                Yes - that should work just fine with a twbx. (Honestly, probably even better than the twb, because he won't lose the resources. )

                • 5. Re: What happens when you save a .twbx file back to .twb?
                  Shawn Wallwork

                  A twbx file is simple a zip file (with a Tableau specific extension). It can be opened up and extracted using any zip utility (like 7-Zip). Inside this zip file is are all the elements required to reproduce the vizzes in the workbook. They are arranged in subfolders created by Tableau so it knows where to find the various elements.

                   

                  Question: What are these 'source files'? Excel, csv, Tableau extracts, other?

                   

                  --Shawn