10 Replies Latest reply on Oct 13, 2015 6:25 AM by Toby Erkson

    Community Appreciation - Alexander Mou

    Rody Zakovich

      Hello Everyone!

       

      In honor of TCC15, I wanted to start a series of Community Appreciation talks for the month of October.

       

      Each day, I will be writing about individuals in our community who go above and beyond to help solve questions and share knowledge.

       

      I believe there are several individuals who dedicate many hours (And sometimes brain cells) to help make our community be so great! And I just want to recognize them for there contributions.

       

      Though I have several people in mind, I don't want this to be solely "MY" appreciation, but the community's. So please feel free to email people who you want to give a BIG Thank You to, OR (If you want to) volunteer to write up on somebody one day this month.

       

      You can reach me anytime at RodyZakovich@gmail.com

       

      Ok, now on to some recognition!


      Today I want to recognize a member of our community who really puts in some serious effort, Mr. Alexander Mou


      Odds are, if you have been on the forums for any more than 5 minutes, you have seen Alexander's work in the community. He is a great help, and has assisted more people than I can even count. What makes Alexander so fantastic is the extra effort he puts in to helping others. Not only does Alexander give valuable solutions, but he posts all of his example workbook/solutions on Tableau Public so that anyway can download and interact with them. Even if the user doesn't provide an example workbook (Which happens a lot), he goes out of his way to create one. Now that's really going above and beyond!


      In addition to the great work Alexander does in the community, he also provides valuable content on his blog.


      Vizible Difference


      You are going to want to add this to blog roll, if you haven't already! I know I've referenced it quite a few times in responses. One of my personal favorites is his post on how to make Case Statements easy


      Vizible Difference: Coding Case Statement Made Easy


      This one has saved me some valuable key strokes!


      THANK YOU Alexander for all your hard work! It is truly appreciated.


      Best Regards,

      Rody Zakovich



        • 1. Re: Community Appreciation - Alexander Mou
          Mark Fraser

          Rody

           

          Alongside all of that... you forgot Alexander's language skills... having a Chinese speaker on the forum is invaluable to supporting a group of users within the community who (I find) more difficult to help because of my lack of language skills...

           

          Thank you Alexander

           

          Cheers

          Mark

          1 of 1 people found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Community Appreciation - Alexander Mou
            Simon Runc

            ...and a large amount of Appreciation from myself too!

             

            Alexander's blog is one of the most interesting out there...with a really interesting/diverse set of posts from things such an embedding PowerPoint (and Excel, if you can imagine that!) in Tableau, to little tricks to help write case statements, to an update on the 'Order of Operations' diagram to include Sets. He's also comes up with some very interesting solutions, and is always digging to 'really' understand what is going on at the fundamental level. His position on the leader board is testament to number of people he's helped. I've, also personally, learned a lot from Alexander...so a big THANK YOU from me!!

            1 of 1 people found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Community Appreciation - Alexander Mou
              Alexander Mou

              Rody, Mark and Simon, thanks for the kind words!  I am so touched.

               

              Actually I probably learnt more from people in this forum than I put into it. It is such a vibrant community to which I am very grateful. There are so many interesting problems to solve. It is kind of addictive.

               

              Yes, I have answered a few posts in Chinese, Korean, Japanese, French, Portuguese, Spanish etc, which are less likely to get an answer. As long as people speak Tableau, the lingua franca of this forum, they deserve an answer. Many non-native English speakers may not write in English. But they most likely can read English. I don't speak most of their languages. Armed with Google Translate, I can figure out most of what they intend to say. Patrick A Van Der Hyde and Diego medrano do that all the time. Anyone here can do it too. English not being my native language, I apologize myself to her Majesty if I misused or abused Queen's English. BTW, her Majesty must be really proud if she knew that a contingent of British Empire is colonizing the leader board of the new found territory called Tableau World.

               

              I would encourage anyone here to start a blog. Many questions are recurring ones or following some kind of pattern. They are déjà vu. A quick reply would be a pointer to some blog posts. In other words, blogs make knowledge scalable. Otherwise, we have to answer questions one at a time. Sometimes do so repetitively. Given that Tableau has become a victim of its own success, more questions will inundate the forum.

               

              Also, organizing information creates value, not only to the general knowledge, but also to the blogger himself. For me, I write therefore I learn. If I can't write it, I don't understand it, at least not to the degree I would like to be.

               

              There are many people I am very grateful to in the Tableau community where diverse yet like-minded people gathered and helped each other to learn and to create. In particular, I would express my appreciation to Andy Kriebel whose blog is the first one I read. It opened my eyes to the fantastic world of data visualization. Also I would thank Jonathan Drummey, Joshua Milligan and Mark Jackson from whose blogs I learnt a great deal.  Last but not the least, I would thank Joe Mako for his generosity of solving whatever problems that were too difficult for me and offering to have screen share sessions. As I have found out along the way, many of the techniques such as scaffolding, data densification etc, can all be traced back to Joe, the source.

               

              Keep learning and have fun! Hope to meet you at TC15.

               

              Blogs that I mentioned above:

              Andy Kriebel: VizWiz

              Joshua Milligan VizPainter | Tableau Tips and Tricks ● Story Telling ● Beautiful Data Visualizations

              Jonathan Drummey Drawing with Numbers | Thoughts on data visualization and Tableau

              Mark Jackson Tableau Zen

              1 of 1 people found this helpful
              • 4. Re: Community Appreciation - Alexander Mou
                Mark Jackson

                Thanks Alexander! I'm glad my blog has been helpful.

                1 of 1 people found this helpful
                • 5. Re: Community Appreciation - Alexander Mou
                  Joshua Milligan

                  I'll second that.  Thank you Alexander!

                  1 of 1 people found this helpful
                  • 6. Re: Community Appreciation - Alexander Mou
                    Jonathan Drummey

                    Thanks, Alexander!

                     

                    FYI you got Joshua’s and my blogs reversed, he’s VizPainter and I’m Drawing with Numbers.

                    1 of 1 people found this helpful
                    • 7. Re: Community Appreciation - Alexander Mou
                      Alexander Mou

                      Fixed.

                       

                      Painting and drawing are so close that I got a bit confused

                      • 8. Re: Community Appreciation - Alexander Mou
                        kettan

                        I would encourage anyone here to start a blog.

                        I agree although I will not be among the new bloggers. It would be nice if blog articles were integrated parts of various resource collections in this forum. More about this below.

                        Many questions are recurring ones or following some kind of pattern. They are déjà vu. A quick reply would be a pointer to some blog posts. In other words, blogs make knowledge scalable. Otherwise, we have to answer questions one at a time. Sometimes do so repetitively. Given that Tableau has become a victim of its own success, more questions will inundate the forum.

                        Absolutely agree and hereby encourage helpers to create various resource pages inside this community that take the burden of continually re-inventing the same wheel just because we don't know where the needed wheel is in current answers-to-questions-haystack. Tableau Ambassadors are also welcome to improve and add links to current  FAQ resource hubs.  One of the first improvements should be to add blog articles and recommended answers  :-)

                        • 9. Re: Community Appreciation - Alexander Mou
                          kettan

                          Pencils for drawing are more detailed than brushes for painting 

                          • 10. Re: Community Appreciation - Alexander Mou
                            Toby Erkson

                            I don't know Alex well but I do know about his multi-lingual skills which is a huge help and one thing I'm rather envious about.  I've seen him pop up with contributions in various locations and, well, he does a great job of covering things that I just sorta move on...nothing to see here, it's all covered...move along please...

                             

                            Heck, even here in his thank-you he's teaching as I've just learned more about what a blog can do for the reader as well as the writer.  Well done!  Good point about blogging on something that's common and pointing people to it; it's easier than re-inventing the wheel every time someone crawls out of the primordial BI ooze and starts walking upright.