4 Replies Latest reply on Dec 7, 2012 11:33 AM by Shawn Wallwork

    Contest Entry. Your Help, your opinion. Pls.

    Shawn Wallwork

      So I'm entering the Forbes data viz contest, and I'm trying to gauge if my entry is easy to decode? Or is it too complicated? Does the dual axis help or hurt? Is there any unnecessary 'chart junk' that I can get rid of? Am I trying to communicate too much in a single chart?

       

      Contest Entry.PNG

       

      FYI: I created this in Tableau, then polished it in Power Point. I think the contest is for static charts (?).

       

      Thanks for help, comments.

       

      --Shawn

        • 1. Re: Contest Entry. Your Help, your opinion. Pls.
          Alex Kerin

          I really like it. I would have thought of using a slopegraph, - that would also provide easy to see position changes, but can't see how you would incorporate the 'both' information unless you had three colored lines.

           

          I may dispense with the color behind the bars - it's creating another bar that may or may not be encoding info.

           

          I suspect however, this is just a ruse to get Jonathan into the forums.....

          1 of 1 people found this helpful
          • 2. Re: Contest Entry. Your Help, your opinion. Pls.
            Andy Piper

            Subdued color scheme, but looks good. I actually like the coloring behind the bars, and your choice of color for it works well with the color scheme -- its a subtle way to split the categories.

             

            One thing I'm not too sure of is the display of the top and bottom numbers for the Homeowner's Expenditures on Housing. What is special about calling out these numbers and not the others?

             

            Personally, I'd be more interested in the gap in category expenditures of each group.

            1 of 1 people found this helpful
            • 3. Re: Contest Entry. Your Help, your opinion. Pls.
              Shawn Wallwork

              I really like it. I would have thought of using a slopegraph, - that would also provide easy to see position changes, but can't see how you would incorporate the 'both' information unless you had three colored lines.

               

              Yeah, I gave the keeping the two groups separate a shot, but it just go too busy. Maybe I'll see if there's another way.

               

              I may dispense with the color behind the bars - it's creating another bar that may or may not be encoding info.

               

              Yeah I was worried (am worried about that) because it on NOT encoded info -- other than an indication of the general sort or the categories. I tried lines but they had an even stronger sense of encoding.

               

              I suspect however, this is just a ruse to get Jonathan into the forums.....

              HA! I only wish I was that clever. But then he could be sitting there with his click-finger twitching away! (I hope not Jonathan.)

               

              Thanks for the feedback Alex. I'll see if I can noodle this a bit more.

               

              --Shawn

              • 4. Re: Contest Entry. Your Help, your opinion. Pls.
                Shawn Wallwork

                Subdued color scheme, but looks good. I actually like the coloring behind the bars, and your choice of color for it works well with the color scheme -- its a subtle way to split the categories.

                I tried the Color-Blind palette for the first time. Did think I'd like it but I'm starting to. Yeah, that is the whole purpose 'split the categories'. The extremely subtle white line also helps (at least in my mind).

                 

                One thing I'm not too sure of is the display of the top and bottom numbers for the Homeowner's Expenditures on Housing. What is special about calling out these numbers and not the others?

                 

                This is something I am very much on the fence about. The call-out isn't intended as emphasis for this particular mark, but an example of 'how to read the chart'. Sort of: 'Hey folks these marks are tied to this axis'. Without it my lovely wife was a bit confused. But you're right it does have the potential of being confusing in and of itself.

                 

                Personally, I'd be more interested in the gap in category expenditures of each group.

                 

                I'll take another look at that. When I first messed with it, it seemed that it was fairly consistent (generally) except the homeowners and renters now spend about the same on apparel. But I'll look again.

                 

                Thanks for your thoughts/ideas. This was interesting.

                 

                --Shawn